Fly line winder and holder

I don’t remember who showed me this trick, but I use it for cleaning my fly lines and backing.

This gadget will strip the line off quickly, and doesn’t cost an arm and a leg.

I take an electric cord holder and stuff the holes with a pool noodle.  After the pool noodle is in place I cut to length.

 

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Garlic bread

2 cups of water, 95-110°F
1 tablespoon of yeast, or 2 packages
1 tablespoon of sugar
2½ teaspoon of salt
4 – 8 cups of flour
2 tablespoons of minced garlic

Add all but the flour, and garlic,  in a large mixing bowl, and stir.  Add flour until it is difficult to stir and pulls from the side of the bowl.

On a flour coated surface knead the dough until it feels stiff, and keeps it’s shape when let go.  You may need to add more flour until you reach this stage.

Let the dough rise until double in size.  This completely depends on the yeast, temperature, and a few other factors.  What I do is draw a circle in the flour that is the doubles size, so there is no guesswork.

Lightly grease 2 loaf pans.

Split the dough into 2 equal size pieces, and roll the bread dough out to about 3/8″ thick and smear the garlic evenly. Roll the dough up and place in the loaf pans.

Let rise again to twice the size, again, before baking.

Preheat oven to 400°F

Bake for 20-35 minutes.  The crust will be a golden brown when done.

Let stand for at least 10 minutes before cutting.

Pizza crust

1 cups of water
1 cup scalded milk
¼ cup coconut oil ,melted
1 tablespoon of yeast, or 2 packages
1 tablespoon of sugar
½ teaspoon Italian seasoning
2½ teaspoon of salt
4 – 8 cups of flour

When you mix the water, milk and coconut oil, it should be between 95-110°F.

Add all but the flour in a large mixing bowl, and stir.  Add flour until it is difficult to stir and pulls from the side of the bowl.

On a flour coated surface knead the dough until it feels stiff, and keeps it’s shape when let go.  You may need to add more flour until you reach this stage.

Let the dough rise until double in size.  This completely depends on the yeast, temperature, and a few other factors.  What I do is draw a circle in the flour that is the doubles size, so there is no guesswork.

Roll the dough out to the size you want.  You should get between 2-4 pizza crusts.

Lightly grease a pizza pan, and sprinkle with corn meal.

Preheat oven to 400°F

Bake for 10-15 minutes.  The crust will be a very brown when done.

Add all toppings and bake until almost done, 20-35 minutes

Add cheese and bake for the last 10-15 minutes.

 

French bread

2 cups of water, 95-110°F
1 tablespoon of yeast, or 2 packages
1 tablespoon of sugar
2½ teaspoon of salt
4 – 8 cups of flour

Add all but the flour in a large mixing bowl, and stir.  Add flour until it is difficult to stir and pulls from the side of the bowl.

On a flour coated surface knead the dough until it feels stiff, and keeps it’s shape when let go.  You may need to add more flour until you reach this stage.

Let the dough rise until double in size.  This completely depends on the yeast, temperature, and a few other factors.  What I do is draw a circle in the flour that is the doubles size, so there is no guesswork.

Roll the dough between your hands to give it a long shape.  The thinner it is, the harder the crust.  You should have between 4-8 long loaves.  Slice the loaves diagonally across the top.  This will allow the bread to rise without cracking.

Lightly grease a cookie sheet, and sprinkle with corn meal.

Preheat oven to 400°F

Bake for 20-35 minutes.  The crust will be a golden brown when done.

Let stand for at least 10 minutes before cutting.

Working on the dock, and then….

Our dock was put in years ago, and as time has passed it needed some work.  Just yesterday Charlie and I put in a couple of replacement boards.

Today I decided to take a hammer to the nails that were sticking up.  There are 2 nails on every floor piece at each cross member.  After a bit of trial and error, I decided that the best method was to use a folding chair and sliding it back after whacking a few nails on the head.

I made my way halfway down the dock, and starting back I lost track of where I was, and before I knew it I had run out of dock, but not out of water.  Two of the chairs’ legs went off the dock, with me and the chair right behind those errant legs.

Splashing into the cove’s water was not a big event, but trying to stand up in the soft mud was a bit more of a challenge.   Floundering back to the dock, I was just happy that nobody was around to see my mishap.

Today would have been a good day to have hot water at the cabin.